David Attenborough thanks Glastonbury festivalgoers for going plastic-free

Image: Globelet; a New Zealand-based company making reusable water bottles and cups from recycled plastic for major events and festivals.

Image: Globelet; a New Zealand-based company making reusable water bottles and cups from recycled plastic for major events and festivals.

Sir David Attenborough took to the Pyramid Stage on the final day of Glastonbury Festival to praise the ban on single-use plastic bottles at this year’s event.

The 93-year-old environmentalist and documentary-maker was met with resounding applause as he thanked festivalgoers for doing their bit to reduce plastic pollution.

“Now this great festival has gone plastic-free,” he said. “That is more than one million bottles of water that have not been drunk by you in plastic. Thank you! Thank you!

“The ocean covers two-thirds of this planet of ours… the land only covers one third of the globe. There are seven great continents on which we human beings live. 

“Each of them has its own marvellous creatures – birds and mammals, animals of all kinds. Each of them has its own glory, each of them has its own problems,” said Sir David.

As whale sounds were being played from the speakers, Sir David told the audience the sea creatures’ “songs” were from ‘Blue Planet II’.

“There was one sequence in ‘Blue Planet II’ which everyone seems to remember,” Sir David said.

“It is the one in which we showed what plastic has done to the creatures that live in the ocean. It had an extraordinary effect.”

Sir David also revealed that the BBC’s new natural history series ‘Seven Worlds, One Planet’ would begin “later on this year”.

The extended trailer for ‘Seven Worlds, One Planet’ was played for the audience, which features a new song from Australian singer Sia, in collaboration with Hans Zimmer, called ‘Out There’.

This year Glastonbury Festival organisers made it mandatory for festivalgoers to sign the event’s Green Pledge in order to register for tickets.

The 'Love the Farm, Leave no Trace' pledge urged people to minimise the damage to the farmland where Glastonbury is held by not littering, taking rubbish and camping gear home, and bringing reusable water bottles to the festival.

The festival’s eco efforts have not been without problems, with reports of water shortages that saw mammoth queues at drinking taps, and unworkable showers.

Photos have also been shared on social media revealing the extent of the rubbish and debris left over from festivalgoers.